Back Pain Home > Amrix

Amrix is a prescription medication used for treating muscle spasms due to injury or other muscle problems. It comes in an extended-release capsule that prolongs the effects of the muscle relaxant. Amrix works only to relieve muscle spasms caused by problems in the muscle (not by the brain or spinal cord). While most people tolerate it well, potential side effects include fatigue, constipation, and dizziness.

What Is Amrix?

Amrix® (cyclobenzaprine ER) is a long-acting prescription muscle relaxant. It is meant to be used temporarily to treat muscle spasms due to injury or other muscle problems. Unlike other muscle relaxants, it is taken just once a day.
 
(Click Amrix Uses for more information, including possible off-label uses.)
 

Who Makes It?

Amrix is made by Eurand, Inc., and is marketed and distributed by Cephalon, Inc.
 

How Does It Work?

Amrix works mostly in the brain stem, not in the spinal cord and not directly on the muscles. The medication works only to relieve muscle spasms caused by problems in the muscle; it does not help with muscle spasms caused by problems in the brain or spinal cord.
 
Amrix comes in an extended-release capsule that prolongs the effects of the medication, much longer than regular short-acting cyclobenzaprine capsules (Flexeril®).
 

When and How to Take Amrix

Some general considerations include the following:
 
  • Amrix comes in capsule form. It is usually taken by mouth once a day.
     
  • You can take the medication any time of the day, but it is best to take it consistently at the same time each day. Taking Amrix in the evening may help reduce daytime drowsiness.
     
  • In general, Amrix should only be used for two to three weeks at a time.
     
  • You can take the medication with food or on an empty stomach. If it bothers your stomach, try taking it with food.
     
  • Be sure to swallow the capsules whole. Do not open, crush, or chew the capsules.
     
  • For the medication to work properly, it must be taken as prescribed. It will not work if you stop taking it.
     
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD;
Last updated/reviewed:
List of references (click here):
Other Articles in This eMedTV Presentation
Advertisement


Topics

Medications

Quicklinks

Related Channels

eMedTV Links
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.

eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.