Back Pain Articles A-Z

Sciatica Symptoms - Spinal Stenosis Surgery

This page contains links to eMedTV Back Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Sciatica Symptoms to Spinal Stenosis Surgery. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Sciatica Symptoms
    The severity of sciatica symptoms depends on how much of the sciatic nerve is compressed. This eMedTV article highlights both common and severe signs and symptoms of sciatica, ranging from burning low back pain to loss of muscle control.
  • Sciattica
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, sciatica is a health condition that is caused by compression of the sciatic nerve. This page discusses possible causes and symptoms of sciatica. Sciattica is a common misspelling of sciatica.
  • Siatica
    Sciatica is a condition that causes shock-like or burning lower back pain. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at possible causes of this condition. A link to more detailed information is also included. Siatica is a common misspelling of sciatica.
  • Side Effects of Acetaminophen With Codeine
    Common side effects of acetaminophen with codeine include dizziness, nausea, and shortness of breath. This eMedTV page lists other side effects to look out for and explains which acetaminophen with codeine side effects may require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Ketorolac Nasal Spray
    Some of the most common side effects of ketorolac nasal spray include nasal pain and throat irritation. This eMedTV page further explores the side effects of this drug, including statistics on how often they occur and which reactions require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Morphine Sulfate
    Some of the common side effects of morphine sulfate include drowsiness, dizziness, and nausea. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at several side effects of this drug, including a list of serious side effects that require prompt medical care.
  • Side Effects of Orally Disintegrating Tramadol
    Nausea, headaches, and vertigo are some of the most common side effects of orally disintegrating tramadol. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at these and other problems that may occur during treatment, including potentially serious side effects.
  • Side Effects of Propoxyphene/Acetaminophen
    Common side effects of propoxyphene/acetaminophen include nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects and describes some of the problems that may require medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Tapentadol
    Constipation, nausea, and drowsiness are just a few of the common side effects of tapentadol. This eMedTV segment provides a more detailed list of potential side effects, including information on symptoms that require immediate medical attention.
  • Skalaxin
    Skelaxin is a prescription muscle relaxant used to treat certain types of muscle spasms. This eMedTV resource provides a brief overview of the drug and includes a link to more detailed information. Skalaxin is a common misspelling of Skelaxin.
  • Skelaxin
    Skelaxin is a drug approved to treat muscle spasms due to injuries or other muscle problems. This eMedTV Web article describes how Skelaxin works, explains what you should know before taking the prescription drug, and lists possible side effects.
  • Skelaxin 800 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, using 800 mg Skelaxin tablets three or four times a day can help relieve muscle spasms. This page covers Skelaxin dosing guidelines for adults and children as young as 12, and offers tips on using this drug.
  • Skelaxin and Breastfeeding
    Women who are breastfeeding are typically advised to avoid Skelaxin (metaxalone). This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Skelaxin and breastfeeding, and explains what to watch for in your infant if you are taking the medicine while nursing.
  • Skelaxin and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is not known if it is safe to use Skelaxin (metaxalone) during pregnancy. Skelaxin is considered a pregnancy Category B drug (as it did not cause problems in pregnant rats), but the full risks are currently unknown.
  • Skelaxin Dosage
    The standard Skelaxin dosage (regardless of age) is one tablet (800 mg) taken three or four times daily. This eMedTV Web resource highlights other Skelaxin dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to take this prescription muscle relaxant.
  • Skelaxin Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses the muscle relaxant Skelaxin. Drug information includes its side effects, drug interactions, warnings, dosing, and precautions.
  • Skelaxin Interactions
    Medications that can negatively interact with Skelaxin include barbiturates, narcotics, or sleep medicines. This eMedTV Web page includes a more complete list of substances that can cause Skelaxin drug interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Skelaxin Medication Information
    This eMedTV page covers important information on Skelaxin, a medication used for treating muscle spasms in adults and children as young as 12 years old. This page also covers why Skelaxin may not be suitable for everyone and lists possible side effects.
  • Skelaxin Muscle Relaxer
    As a muscle relaxer, Skelaxin can help treat certain types of muscle spasms. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at Skelaxin, including information on how it works, why it may not be suitable for everyone, and possible side effects.
  • Skelaxin Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral Skelaxin tablets may be prescribed to treat muscle spasms in adults and children as young as 12 years old. This page also describes how this drug works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Skelaxin Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, medical attention is needed if you believe you have overdosed on Skelaxin (metaxalone), as it may result in life-threatening complications. This page describes the effects of a Skelaxin overdose and treatment options.
  • Skelaxin Pill Information
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Skelaxin is a prescribed medication used to treat muscle spasms. This article offers more information on Skelaxin pills, including some general precautions and potential side effects.
  • Skelaxin Side Effects
    Nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness are some of the common side effects of Skelaxin. This selection from the eMedTV Web library lists other common Skelaxin side effects, as well as more serious side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Skelaxin Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web resource discusses, Skelaxin is a prescription medicine used to treat muscle spasms. This article offers more detail on Skelaxin, including information on how the tablets work, potential Skelaxin side effects, and available strengths.
  • Skelaxin Uses
    Skelaxin is primarily used for relieving pain, tenderness, and stiffness due to muscle spasms. This eMedTV page covers Skelaxin uses in more detail, including possible off-label uses and its use in children. This page also explains how the drug works.
  • Skelaxin Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely take Skelaxin if you have certain conditions, such as liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV segment offers other important Skelaxin warnings and precautions, including information on who should not take the medication.
  • Snorting Morphine Sulfate
    As this eMedTV page explains, some people may abuse morphine sulfate by snorting the medication. This article explains that morphine abuse is different from a simple, physical dependence on the drug, and covers where to find help for this addiction.
  • Soma
    Soma is a form of muscle relaxant that is available by prescription only. This eMedTV article describes how Soma works to treat muscle spasms, explains how and when to use the drug, and lists potential side effects that may occur with treatment.
  • Soma 250 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV segment explains, a healthcare provider may prescribe 250 mg Soma tablets to treat muscle spasms. This page further discusses Soma dosing guidelines and offers some tips on using this muscle relaxant.
  • Soma 350 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, using 350 mg Soma tablets three times daily and at bedtime can help treat muscle spasms. This page covers the standard recommended Soma dosage for treating muscle spasms and offers some tips on using this drug.
  • Soma Abuse
    Although Soma (carisoprodol) is not a controlled substance, it has the potential to be abused. This eMedTV article explores the potential for Soma abuse and explains how you can help reduce the risk of drug dependence.
  • Soma and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid using Soma (carisoprodol) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Soma and breastfeeding, and describes the potential problems that may occur if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Soma and Insomnia
    Insomnia appears to be a potential side effect of Soma (carisoprodol). As this eMedTV page explains, in clinical trials with Soma, insomnia was not a reported side effect. However, it was reported during postmarketing experience.
  • Soma and Pregnancy
    Soma (carisoprodol) is a muscle relaxant that may not be safe to use during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page discusses Soma and pregnancy in more detail and describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Soma Dosage
    The recommended dosage of Soma is one 250 mg or 350 mg tablet three times a day and at bedtime. This part of the eMedTV library offers more Soma dosage guidelines and includes a list of tips and precautions for taking the medication.
  • Soma Interactions
    Phenytoin, modafinil, and delavirdine are medicines that may cause negative Soma interactions. This eMedTV resource lists other products that may interact with Soma and describes the potentially negative effects of these interactions.
  • Soma Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web article discusses important information on Soma, a medication used for treating muscle spasms in adults and adolescents as young as 16 years old. This page also covers why Soma may not be suitable for everyone and lists side effects.
  • Soma Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses the medication Soma. Information includes its uses, dosing, side effects, warnings, precautions, and possible drug interactions.
  • Soma Muscle Relaxer
    As a muscle relaxer, Soma is a medication that temporarily treats certain types of muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at Soma, including information on how it works and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Soma Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral Soma tablets may be prescribed to treat muscle spasms in adults and adolescents as young as 16 years old. This page also describes how this drug works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Soma Overdose
    Seizures, dilated pupils, and headaches are possible symptoms of a Soma (carisoprodol) overdose. This eMedTV page explores the potential dangers of a Soma overdose and describes the steps your doctor may take to treat an overdose.
  • Soma Pill Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, Soma is a prescribed medication used to treat certain types of muscle spasms. This page offers an overview of important information on Soma pills, including some general precautions and potential side effects of the drug.
  • Soma Side Effects
    Dizziness, headaches, and drowsiness are the most commonly reported Soma side effects. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare but potentially serious side effects of Soma and side effects that were reported in postmarketing experience.
  • Soma Tablets
    Available in the form of tablets, Soma is a prescription medicine used to temporarily treat muscle spasms. This eMedTV page offers more detail on Soma, including information on how the drug works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Soma Uses
    Soma is used for treating muscle spasms caused by injury or other muscle problems. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how this medication works, explores possible off-label Soma uses, and discusses the use of the drug in children.
  • Soma Warnings and Precautions
    Talk to your doctor before using Soma if you have epilepsy. This eMedTV page lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before using Soma. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur are also listed in this article.
  • Somma
    Soma is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat muscle spasms. This eMedTV article describes how Soma works and explains how often (and for how long) the drug should be used. Somma is a common misspelling of Soma.
  • Spinal Stenois
    As this eMedTV page explains, spinal stenosis is a narrowing of an area of the spine, which can cause pain and numbness. This page also describes who is more likely to develop this condition. Spinal stenois is a common misspelling of spinal stenosis.
  • Spinal Stenoses
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, spinal stenosis occurs in men and women, and results in pain or numbness in the legs or shoulders. This page also explains what causes spinal stenosis. Spinal stenoses is a common misspelling of spinal stenosis.
  • Spinal Stenosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, a person with spinal stenosis may experience pain as a result of pressure on the spinal cord. This article takes an in-depth look at this condition, including what causes certain areas of the spine to narrow.
  • Spinal Stenosis Diagnosis
    A spinal stenosis diagnosis will be made only after doctors have ruled out other possible conditions. This eMedTV article explains the tests that are commonly used to make this diagnosis, which include x-rays and bone scans.
  • Spinal Stenosis Information
    As this eMedTV segment explains, a person with spinal stenosis may have pain or numbness in the legs as a result of pressure being put on the spinal cord. This article offers more information on spinal stenosis, including details on who it affects.
  • Spinal Stenosis Surgery
    The most common surgery for spinal stenosis is called decompressive laminectomy. This eMedTV article includes information about when this option is typically considered and the possible risks and complications that may be involved.
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