Back Pain Articles A-Z

Lower Back Pain Diagnosis - Oxycoden

This page contains links to eMedTV Back Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Lower Back Pain Diagnosis to Oxycoden. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Lower Back Pain Diagnosis
    A variety of tests are available to help doctors make a lower back pain diagnosis. This eMedTV article describes each of these tests in detail, such as discography, myleogram, and x-rays, and explains when each one might be used.
  • Lower Back Pain Relief
    People seeking lower back pain relief may try medications, complementary/alternative methods, or surgery. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at these and other pain-relief techniques, including ice and heat, bed rest, and exercise.
  • Lower Back Surgery
    This eMedTV article describes the types of lower back surgery that are available, including a discectomy. It can take months for a person to be fully healed after such a surgery, and some people may suffer from permanent loss of flexibility.
  • Lumbar Spinal Stenosis
    This eMedTV page includes information about the spine and how it relates to lumbar spinal stenosis. The condition is generally the result of pressure on the lower part of the spinal cord or on nerve roots. Links to more information are also provided.
  • Methacarbamol
    Methocarbamol is used, in combination with rest and physical therapy, to treat pain caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web article talks about the strengths and side effects of this drug. Methacarbamol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methacarbanol
    People with muscle spasms may find relief with methocarbamol, a prescription muscle relaxant. This part of the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at this drug and its uses. Methacarbanol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methacarbomol
    Methocarbamol is a medicine used along with rest and physical therapy to treat muscle spasms. This eMedTV selection explores the dosing guidelines, uses, and side effects of this drug. Methacarbomol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methacarbonol
    Methocarbamol is used to treat muscle spasms, such as those due to an injury. This eMedTV segment gives a brief introduction to this medication, explaining the forms and strengths available. Methacarbonol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methcarbamol
    Methocarbamol, a muscle relaxant, is used to relieve pain caused by muscle spasms. This part of the eMedTV site describes this drug in greater detail and provides a link to more information. Methcarbamol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocaramol
    Available as a tablet or an injection, methocarbamol is a drug used to treat pain caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV article briefly describes the medication and provides a link to more information. Methocaramol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbam
    Methocarbamol is a type of muscle relaxant used for the short-term treatment of muscle spasms. This eMedTV article describes this drug briefly and provides a link to more information. Methocarbam is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbam 750 mg Drug Information
    Brand-name methocarbamol tablets are available in a 750-mg strength. This part of the eMedTV site takes a closer look at the strengths available for this medicine. Methocarbam 750 drug information is a common misspelling and variation of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbamol
    A prescription medicine, methocarbamol is used to treat muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at this medication, with information on potential side effects, when and how to take it, warnings and safety precautions, and more.
  • Methocarbamol 500 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV article explains, 500 mg methocarbamol tablets are available only in generic form. This resource tells you more about the different forms and strengths of methocarbamol, including a link to more detailed information.
  • Methocarbamol 750 mg
    This selection from the eMedTV archives explains that methocarbamol is available as 750 mg and 500 mg tablets. This Web page tells you what you need to know about methocarbamol dosing, including a link to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Methocarbamol and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if methocarbamol (Robaxin) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about breastfeeding and methocarbamol, including what to watch for if your doctor recommends taking this drug while nursing.
  • Methocarbamol and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment explains why methocarbamol (Robaxin) is a pregnancy Category C medication. It describes how the FDA rates drugs during pregnancy and explains the circumstances under which the medication may be given to a pregnant woman.
  • Methocarbamol Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the typical dose of methocarbamol tablets is 1500 mg, four times daily, for the first two or three days of treatment. This resource offers more information on when and how to take this drug, both tablets and injections.
  • Methocarbamol Drug Information
    Methocarbamol is a prescription muscle relaxant used to treat muscle spasms. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers more drug information on methocarbamol, including dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and available strengths.
  • Methocarbamol Oral Information
    Methocarbamol is a drug used to relieve muscle spasms, along with physical therapy and other treatments. This eMedTV segment provides basic information on oral methocarbamol and includes a link to the full-length article on the topic.
  • Methocarbamol Overdose
    Nausea, drowsiness, and blurred vision are some of the symptoms of an overdose with methocarbamol (Robaxin). This eMedTV segment explains what you can expect if you take too much of this drug, including information on treatment options.
  • Methocarbamol Side Effects
    Headache, drowsiness, and heartburn are some of the possible methocarbamol side effects. This eMedTV article discusses other side effects that may occur with this medication, including a list of adverse reactions that require immediate medical care.
  • Methocarbanol
    Available by prescription only, methocarbamol is used as a treatment for muscle spasms. This eMedTV selection tells you what you need to know about this drug and includes a link to more information. Methocarbanol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbinol
    Your healthcare provider may recommend methocarbamol if you have pain caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web resource gives a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Methocarbinol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbomal
    Methocarbamol is a prescription muscle relaxant that works on the central nervous system. As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, it is used for the treatment of short-term muscle spasms. Methocarbomal is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbomol
    A muscle relaxant, methocarbamol is a medication that treats pain caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at this drug, describing its side effects and dosing guidelines. Methocarbomol is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Methocarbonal
    Approved for treating muscle spasms, methocarbamol is a muscle relaxant available only with a prescription. This eMedTV Web resource gives an overview of this medicine and its potential side effects. Methocarbonal is a common misspelling of methocarbamol.
  • Morphin Sulf
    Morphine sulfate, a prescription medicine used to treat pain, is a type of opioid narcotic. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Morphin sulf is a common misspelling of morphine sulfate.
  • Morphin Sulfate
    As a type of opioid medication, morphine sulfate can help treat pain. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of morphine sulfate and describes some of its possible side effects. Morphin sulfate is a common misspelling of morphine sulfate.
  • Morphine Sulfate
    Morphine sulfate is a type of opiate narcotic used in many prescription pain relievers. This eMedTV page features an overview of this drug, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Morphine Sulfate 15 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web resource discusses, morphine sulfate 15 mg tablets may be prescribed for pain relief. This article offers more detail on morphine sulfate, including a list of various forms of the medication and the strengths available.
  • Morphine Sulfate 30 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, morphine sulfate 30 mg tablets are a short-acting, immediate-release pain medication. This page offers more detail on morphine sulfate, including a list of other morphine products and strengths available.
  • Morphine Sulfate Dosage
    Your morphine sulfate dosage will be based on several factors, such as the severity of your pain. This eMedTV Web segment describes the other factors that may affect your dose, and offers tips on when and how to take this medication.
  • Morphine Sulfate Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about morphine sulfate? As this eMedTV article explains, this narcotic is most often used to treat pain. This resource gives a brief overview of this drug, with details on risks, available forms, and more.
  • No Prescription Hydrocodone
    You should not buy hydrocodone with no prescription. Hydrocodone, as this eMedTV page explains, is a controlled substance that is subject to regulation by the DEA. There are strict fines and penalties for trying to buy the drug without a prescription.
  • No Rx Hydrocodone
    You should never buy a no-Rx hydrocodone product, as the drug could be substandard or potentially dangerous. This eMedTV Web page further discusses the potential dangers of using hydrocodone that has been purchased without a prescription.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol
    Orally disintegrating tramadol is a prescription pain medication. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this drug, with information on what type of pain it is approved to treat, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, orally disintegrating tramadol is usually taken two to four times a day. This Web page explains the dosing guidelines for orally disintegrating tramadol, explaining why it's important to start with a low amount.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol Information
    If you are an adult with mild-to-moderate pain, your doctor may recommend orally disintegrating tramadol. This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on this drug, including how it is taken, what to expect during treatment, and more.
  • Ordering Hydrocodone Without a Prescription
    You must have a valid prescription to buy hydrocodone. As this section of the eMedTV library explains, ordering hydrocodone without a prescription is not only illegal but also unsafe (as you should not take this drug without a doctor's supervision).
  • Oxcodone
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe oxycodone medications to treat pain. This page also explains the drug's significant potential for abuse and offers a link to more detailed information. Oxcodone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxicodon
    This eMedTV Web article explains that oxycodone is an opioid narcotic found in many prescription pain medications. This article also describes the abuse potential and possible side effects of oxycodone. Oxicodon is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxicodone
    Oxycodone is found in many prescription medications and is approved to treat pain. This eMedTV Web article explains how oxycodone works and describes what to do in the case of an overdose on the drug. Oxicodone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxicodone Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV page explains, stopping oxycodone too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as diarrhea and vomiting. This page describes other oxycodone withdrawal symptoms. Oxicodone withdrawal is a common misspelling of oxycodone withdrawal.
  • Oxocodone
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how oxycodone works to treat pain. This page also describes the factors that may affect your dosage and lists some general precautions with the drug. Oxocodone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodeine
    As this eMedTV page explains, oxycodone is an ingredient found in many prescription pain relievers. This page also describes the various available forms of oxycodone and covers its potential for abuse. Oxycodeine is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycoden
    Oxycodone, a type of opioid narcotic, is found in many prescription pain relievers. This page of the eMedTV Web library provides a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Oxycoden is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
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