Back Pain Articles A-Z

Oxycodene - Precautions and Warnings With Tapentadol

This page contains links to eMedTV Back Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Oxycodene to Precautions and Warnings With Tapentadol. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Oxycodene
    This eMedTV Web article features a brief overview of oxycodone, an ingredient found in many prescription pain relievers. This page also describes possible side effects and some general precautions. Oxycodene is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodin
    As a type of opioid narcotic, oxycodone medications can help treat pain. This eMedTV Web segment provides a brief overview of oxycodone, including how it works and some of its potential side effects. Oxycodin is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodine
    A doctor may prescribe medications that contain oxycodone to treat pain. This eMedTV Web resource offers a brief description of oxycodone and explains what to tell your doctor before taking it. Oxycodine is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodine Overdose
    If you think you have taken too much oxycodone, seek immediate medical care. This eMedTV page further discusses the potential dangers of an oxycodone overdose, including possible symptoms. Oxycodine overdose is a common misspelling of oxycodone overdose.
  • Oxycodon
    Oxycodone is an opioid narcotic found in many prescription pain medications. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at oxycodone, including how it works, possible side effects, and various forms available. Oxycodon is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodone
    Oxycodone is a type of narcotic found in many prescription pain medications. This eMedTV Web segment describes how the drug works, lists potential side effects that may occur, and explains what you should be aware of before using this medication.
  • Oxycodone 10 mg
    This eMedTV article explains that 10 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This page further discusses oxycodone, including whether this drug is available as a generic. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • Oxycodone 20 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, 20 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article further discusses the 20 mg tablets, and also offers a link to more information on other forms of oxycodone medications.
  • Oxycodone 30 mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, 30 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article further discusses oxycodone tablets, and also offers a link to more information on other forms of oxycodone medications.
  • Oxycodone 40 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, 40 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article takes a closer look at oxycodone, including whether it comes as a generic. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • Oxycodone 5 mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, 5 mg oxycodone tablets, capsules, and oral solution are just some of the various forms of oxycodone that are available. This article provides a list of other forms and strengths of oxycodone that are available.
  • Oxycodone Abuse
    As this eMedTV page explains, oxycodone has a significant potential for both physical and psychological dependence and abuse. This article further discusses the abuse of oxycodone, including possible signs that a person may be abusing this pain medicine.
  • Oxycodone Addiction
    People can become addicted to oxycodone. This eMedTV resource lists common signs of addiction and explains where you can get help for this problem. This page also describes the difference between addiction and physical dependence on the drug.
  • Oxycodone and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid taking oxycodone if you are nursing. This eMedTV page further explores breastfeeding and oxycodone, including details on how this medication passes through breast milk and the problems it may cause in a nursing baby.
  • Oxycodone and Constipation
    As this portion of the eMedTV Web library explains, constipation is a likely and expected side effect of oxycodone. This article also explains that if constipation occurs while taking oxycodone, you should talk to your doctor about using a laxative.
  • Oxycodone and Pregnancy
    Research on pregnancy and oxycodone indicates that this medication is unlikely to cause birth defects. As this eMedTV page explains, however, oxycodone is a narcotic and may cause withdrawal symptoms (such as a rapid heart rate) in an infant after birth.
  • Oxycodone Dosage
    In general, most people will start with a short-acting oxycodone product at a low dosage. This eMedTV page offers more detailed information on dosage recommendations for oxycodone, including tips on effectively and safely using this medication.
  • Oxycodone Drug Interactions
    Muscle relaxants, sleep medicines, or antidepressants may cause serious drug interactions with oxycodone. This eMedTV article lists other products that may interfere with oxycodone and describes the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Oxycodone HCL Medication Information
    This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a look at important information on oxycodone HCl, a medication used for pain relief. This page also explains why oxycodone HCl may not be suitable for some people and describes possible side effects.
  • Oxycodone Hydrochloride
    Oxycodone hydrochloride is an ingredient found in many prescription pain medications. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of this medication, including information on its potential for abuse, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Oxycodone Maximum Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the maximum oxycodone dosage will vary, depending on several factors, such as your tolerance to opioid drugs and the severity of your pain. This page further explains why there is no standard maximum dosage for this drug.
  • Oxycodone Medicine for Pain
    As a pain medicine, oxycodone works by binding to opioid receptors throughout the body. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at oxycodone, including information on how it works and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Oxycodone Online
    If you are searching for ways to buy oxycodone online, it is important to look for a legitimate pharmacy. This eMedTV page further discusses some tips on how to find a legitimate online pharmacy and why you should not buy oxycodone without a prescription.
  • Oxycodone Oral
    As this page from the eMedTV Web library discusses, oral oxycodone medications may be prescribed to treat pain. This page also describes how these pain medications work, outlines possible side effects, and offers some general safety precautions.
  • Oxycodone Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on oxycodone. This eMedTV page provides a list of possible overdose symptoms (such as difficulty breathing, extreme drowsiness, and cardiac arrest) and describes possible treatment options.
  • Oxycodone Pills
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oxycodone pills, liquid, and capsules are prescription pain medications. This page offers more detail on oxycodone, including information on its potential for abuse and possible side effects of the medication.
  • Oxycodone Side Effects
    Common side effects of oxycodone may include nausea, headaches, and dizziness. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV Web article also lists potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention, such as seizures and confusion.
  • Oxycodone Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, the primary uses of oxycodone are for treating short-term or long-term pain in adults. However, as this article points out, the drug can also be used "off-label" for pain relief in children or to treat shortness of breath.
  • Oxycodone vs. Hydrocodone
    Although oxycodone and hydrocodone are similar pain relievers, oxycodone is the stronger painkiller. This eMedTV Web page further compares hydrocodone versus oxycodone, including information on the similarities and the differences between the two drugs.
  • Oxycodone vs. OxyContin
    This eMedTV article explores OxyContin vs. oxycodone, explaining how oxycodone is the active ingredient in OxyContin (and several other pain medications). This page also discusses how oxycodone extended release is considered a generic form of OxyContin.
  • Oxycodone Warnings and Precautions
    To ensure proper use of oxycodone, safety precautions for the drug should be reviewed with your doctor. This eMedTV resource contains important warnings and precautions for oxycodone, including information on who should not use this medication.
  • Oxycodone Withdrawal
    If you stop taking oxycodone too quickly, withdrawal symptoms may occur. This eMedTV Web article provides a list of possible symptoms of withdrawal from oxycodone (such as vomiting and diarrhea) and explains how your doctor can help you avoid them.
  • Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms
    Vomiting, diarrhea, and sweating are possible withdrawal symptoms of oxycodone. This eMedTV Web segment further explores potential withdrawal symptoms, including information on when they may occur and how to minimize them.
  • Oxycondone
    Oxycodone is an ingredient found in many prescription medications used to treat pain. This eMedTV article describes oxycodone in more detail and offers general precautions for taking the drug. Oxycondone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Periformis Syndrome
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers a brief overview of piriformis syndrome, a neuromuscular disorder. This page also describes possible symptoms and treatment options. Periformis syndrome is a common misspelling of piriformis syndrome.
  • Pirformis Syndrome
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, piriformis syndrome occurs when a muscle in the buttocks compresses the sciatic nerve. This page also covers symptoms and treatment options. Pirformis syndrome is a common misspelling of piriformis syndrome.
  • Piriformis Syndrome
    Piriformis syndrome occurs when the muscle with the same name compresses or irritates the sciatic nerve. This eMedTV article describes the symptoms and treatment options for this condition, which is a rare neuromuscular disorder.
  • Piriformus Syndrome
    Piriformis syndrome occurs when the sciatic nerve is compressed by a certain muscle in the buttocks. This eMedTV article discusses the symptoms and treatments for the condition. Piriformus syndrome is a common misspelling of piriformis syndrome.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Acetaminophen With Codeine
    Acetaminophen with codeine is a narcotic medication with potential for abuse. This page from the eMedTV library lists other precautions and warnings with acetaminophen with codeine, including information on who may not be suitable to take this drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Fentanyl Patch
    Fentanyl patches may cause life-threatening slow and irregular breathing. This eMedTV article offers other precautions and warnings for the fentanyl patch, including more information on what side effects or complications may occur with this drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Ketorolac Nasal Spray
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have asthma or kidney problems, you may not be able to use ketorolac nasal spray. Precautions and warnings with this drug also include potentially life-threatening side effects, such as heart attacks or strokes.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Methocarbamol
    If you have kidney disease, you should not use the injectable form of methocarbamol. This eMedTV Web resource covers various precautions and warnings with methocarbamol, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Morphine Sulfate
    People with Addison's disease, BPH, or asthma may not be able to take morphine sulfate. This eMedTV Web segment contains additional precautions and warnings with morphine sulfate to be aware of before beginning treatment with the medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Orally Disintegrating Tramadol
    This eMedTV page explains why orally disintegrating tramadol should not be prescribed to people with suicidal tendencies. This article offers a more detailed list of important precautions and warnings for orally disintegrating tramadol.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Propoxyphene/Acetaminophen
    It is generally recommended to avoid using propoxyphene/acetaminophen while pregnant. This eMedTV page contains more precautions and warnings with propoxyphene/acetaminophen, including important information on who should not use this medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Tapentadol
    As this eMedTV page explains, tapentadol is generally not recommended for people with seizure disorders. This article lists many other safety precautions for tapentadol, including more detailed warnings on who should not take this pain reliever.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.